#MG Takes on Thursday

This is a new feature set up by brilliant MG Book Blogger @MaryRees at the blog Book Craic to highlight the wonderful world of Middle Grade books.

You can read all the instructions for taking part on Mary’s blog here.

Here is my first attempt at this meme.

 

 

Author: Catherine Doyle

Illustrator: Bill Bragg

Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s Books

 

Favourite line from Page 11:

“I’m already full of magic. I just have no idea how to get it out of -“

 

This book in three words:

Destiny, Magic, Courage

This is one of the most powerfully moving works of MG fiction published in recent years. Combining a love of family, sense of place, lyrical language and the coming-of-age story of a boy struggling to fulfil his destiny in a battle with an evil foe, it is a story to be enjoyed by anyone from 10 to 100!

You can read my review here. 

 

Well this is my first ever participation in a meme, so I wish to thank Mary for choosing to shine a light on the magic of Middle Grade. I hope that many other bloggers will join in, I look forward to reading your thoughts.

 

#MG Takes on Thursday

This is a new feature set up by brilliant MG Book Blogger @MaryRees at the blog Book Craic to highlight the wonderful world of Middle Grade books.

You can read all the instructions for taking part on Mary’s blog here.

Here is my first attempt at this meme.

 

 

Author: Catherine Doyle

Illustrator: Bill Bragg

Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s Books

 

Favourite line from Page 11:

“I’m already full of magic. I just have no idea how to get it out of -“

 

This book in three words:

Destiny, Magic, Courage

This is one of the most powerfully moving works of MG fiction published in recent years. Combining a love of family, sense of place, lyrical language and the coming-of-age story of a boy struggling to fulfil his destiny in a battle with an evil foe, it is a story to be enjoyed by anyone from 10 to 100!

You can read my review here. 

 

Well this is my first ever participation in a meme, so I wish to thank Mary for choosing to shine a light on the magic of Middle Grade. I hope that many other bloggers will join in, I look forward to reading your thoughts.

 

Review: The Wild Way Home by Sophie Kirtley

The Wild Way Home

This book is an extraordinary feast for the senses. A story about the power of family, it also feels like a celebration of the ancient woodland of the British Isles, with a deep love of nature permeating every description of a majestic tree or the instinctive behaviour of a forest animal. The language resonates with nature-related similes;  examples include the description of footprints in the sandy riverbank: “bird prints, like little letters in another language.” ancient flowers are “massive and speckled and wrong, like tongue-out faces with wavering tentacles.” Meat cooked in the smoke of a fire is “so tender I hardly have to chew and it’s delicious, like ham would be if ham was less pink and more wild.”

 Charlie Merriam loves Mandel Forest which stands at the edge of his home and town, and knows every inch of it, having played there with his two best friends, Lamont and Beaky since their early childhoods. On the eve of his twelfth birthday Charlie finds a deer’s tooth on the forest floor which he picks up to add to his “Mandel Museum”. The following day Charlie goes to visit his much longed-for, newborn baby brother Dara only to find that his parents are devastated as Dara faces a life-saving heart operation. Unable to cope with the anguish, Charlie runs to the forest, from where he glimpses the multiple windows of the distant hospital looking like a fly’s compound eye, each seeing things from a slightly different perspective. 

This is appropriate to Charlie’s sense of disorientation, when, after squeezing the deer tooth tightly in his hand he finds himself in altered surroundings. Although the familiar landmarks are recognisable, the forest seems wilder and the colours and sounds have taken on a greater intensity. Then he spots the body, face down in the stream…

Somehow, Charlie has time-slipped back to the stone-age! As he forges a relationship with Harby, the stone-age boy he rescues from the stream, he begins to realise that both of them are running from emotions too powerful to deal with. The primitive instincts for survival, for companionship, home and family are all explored.

The sense of a landscape linking the distant past with the present day is beautifully imagined in this emotional story, with the ancient Spirit Stone standing as the totemic link between past and present. The tale also conjured for me an evocation of a more carefree past when children spent their summers playing outside and roaming independently rather than being glued to a screen or tracked by worried parents through their digital devices. 

This is an exciting and thought-provoking tale, with some deeply emotional moments and some episodes of heart-stopping, adrenaline-pumping, jeopardy. I would recommend it for readers in Year 6 and beyond, perfect for readers who have loved The Last Wild trilogy by Piers Torday, The Explorer by Katherine Rundell  or Stig of the Dump by Clive King.

I am grateful to Bloomsbury Kids UK for approving me to read an e-ARC of this story on #NetGalley